Feijoa = Pineapple Guava

Feijoa, also known as Pineapple Guava and Guavasteen, are one of my favorite fruits. It is great that here in Napa we can grow this guava without protecting it from winter frosts like we have to do with the other guavas. The petals are edible and the fruit is just now starting to drop. It is ripe and is collected from the ground as soon as you can. The texture of the flesh is like a pear but the taste is a cross of a pineapple, a banana and a strawberry. The skin can be eaten or not. It has been an important commercial crop in Australia and New Zealand for 100 years but is hardly known in the states. It is origianally from Central and South America. I love Feijoa.

Australian Finger Limes are just ripening

Finger Limes are getting to be popular. Stop by the farm if you want to try them. People call them "lime caviar" because inside the green/black/pink skin are hundreds of crisp tiny sour vesicles of juicy goodness. The flowers are pink/white and tiny and the leaves are much smaller than other citrus trees have.

It is naturally found in Australia and is very popular with chefs who like it as an attractive garnish for hors d'oeuvres, seafoods esp sushi or added to a salad or a salad dressing for a tangy pop when you bite them.

They are an understory tree or bush and so hot full sun may be too much for them. They need protection from frost so we cover them on the cold nights or they can be placed in a frost free section of your yard with some sun or near the house to benefit from the warmth at night. This is a fun fruit to try.

Our Farm - a View from the west side

 

This picture was taken from the Main Street side of the farm (vs the Beard Rd side). The very old barn has been earthquake retrofitted. Some of the other "buildings" are shade rooms and frost protection sheds to help keep the young plants happier. We strive to improve the farm and the light/shade situations for the trees each year. The big blue sky is so beautiful over our little farm and makes a lovely backdrop and view while caring for all the plants. Back here are young fruit trees and oak seedlings.

Frost Covers - Almost time to put them away.

We pull the frost covers over to the side when it does not look like we expect frost. We enjoy growing citrus fruit and take the trouble to give them a bit of protection from the coldest nights. Citrus can be grown in a sunny spot next to your house so it will get both the sunshine needed to ripen the fruit and some warmth that leaks from the house at night. Many parts of our area grow fantastic citrus fruit and if your place has both frost protection and lots of sunshine be sure to feed well and often. If your garden has snails or slugs you will know by the holes munched in the leaves. Right now there are fragrant white flowers on the citrus - -what a dreamy smell.